John Cardinal O’Connor School

16 North Broadway 10533 Irvington, NY
Phone: 914-591-9330
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Signs and Symptoms of Auditory Processing Disorder

Auditory Processing Disorder is a hearing disorder that affects a small percentage of school-aged children. A child with APD doesn’t process sounds like other children, due to the inability of their brain and ears to coordinate the sounds. It is especially difficult for them to interpret speech. It is important to diagnose children early to prevent them from experiencing delays in speech and language, which could also add to learning problems in school. Recognizing the signs and symptoms requires an understanding of what to watch for in children of different ages.

Signs and symptoms of APD are not always noticeable in preschool-aged children, but they become more noticeable once they enter grade school. This is due in part to an increase in the need for children to listen to instructions and follow them. Children with the condition have difficulty understanding and remembering information they receive verbally. They also have difficulty separating sounds, like someone speaking to them, from background noise and difficulty remembering what they have read. During middle school, some of the signs and symptoms of APD are the same as those for ADHD, but these are two very different conditions.

Sending children to schools for auditory processing like John Cardinal O’Connor School, will help them overcome their limitations through the appropriate teaching methods. At John Cardinal O’Connor School, we provide children who learn differently with an affordable, language-based academic curriculum. By implementing multisensory teaching techniques, children become interested in classroom work and remain engaged so that the learning process is more efficient.

Preschool

Grade School

Middle School

High School

Difficulty tuning out background noises Doesn’t like for more than one person to be talking in the same room or talking with the TV on Fails to carry out chore lists, instructions, or multi-step directions Difficulty expressing themselves
Easily overwhelmed by loud noises Unwillingness to read out loud in front of you or others Has a lack of understanding for riddles Frequently requests you to repeat statements, even in a quiet area
Doesn’t enjoy being read to Difficulty sounding out words/phonics in general Gets confused when having conversations Talks louder than others around them
Doesn’t hear what you say in spite of apparently listening Problems remembering names, instructions, or other information they have heard Must have information repeated numerous times to retain it Inability to organize thoughts
Confuses words that sound similar Difficulty expressing emotions, answering questions, or carrying on a conversation Struggles with any task that requires a high level of listening skills Inability to understand abstract ideas; Forgetfulness

 

Auditory-Processing-Disorder

Sending children to schools for auditory processing like John Cardinal O’Connor School, will help them overcome their limitations through the appropriate teaching methods. At John Cardinal O’Connor School, we provide children who learn differently with an affordable, language-based academic curriculum. By implementing multisensory teaching techniques, children become interested in classroom work and remain engaged so that the learning process is more efficient.

Multisensory-Instruction

Multisensory Instruction

Multisensory instruction is an education technique that teaches to multiple senses simultaneously. This allows the child to make connections with the information being delivered in more than one way. For the child with APD, this removes the frustration of trying to learn through listening and, instead, allows them to use touch, vision, or even smell to learn new concepts. This approach to teaching was introduced by Orton-Gillingham, leading to a number of techniques and programs used to treat this and other learning disabilities today. This type of hands-on learning allows children to collect information, develop nonverbal problem-solving skills, and understand critical concepts.