John Cardinal O’Connor School

16 North Broadway 10533 Irvington, NY
Phone: 914-591-9330
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Music’s Powerful Impact on Children with Learning Disabilities

February 27th, 2017 by admin

When it comes to helping children with learning disabilities succeed, it can sometimes takes thinking outside the box to find ways better suited to how they learn. Many parents and educators are finding that music is playing a major role in keeping children with learning disabilities engaged and focused, and for those with language based learning disabilities, music is speaking more than to their soul; it’s helping them with articulation and improving speech patterns.

Music has been woven into the fabric of our lives since the dawn of time. It can do more than make you happy or mend a broken heart; it can help you learn. Listening to or playing music is one of the few activities that utilizes both hemispheres of the brain, and that in turn enhances intelligence, learning, and IQ.

A study published in The Journal of Neuroscience found that children who took music lessons for two years didn’t just get better at playing an instrument; they found that playing music also helped their brains process language.

Children with learning disabilities

There are a number of ways children with speech disorders and language based learning difficulties benefit from music:

  • Music activates students mentally, physically, and emotionally, which helps them to better remember and even understand information.
  • Research has shown that music with 50 to 80 beats per minute creates an atmosphere of focus that leads students into deep concentration.
  • Because verses in music are repetitive; rhymes, lyrics, and melody in songs help to increase memory.
  • The vocal exercises involved with singing can improve a child’s breath control, vocal intensity, and articulation.

Music is also an excellent motivational tool to help children work on skills they find challenging. It encourages movement, and playing instruments can help with fine motor skills. It provides an opportunity for social interaction that is appealing to both verbal and non-verbal children.

Meeting children where they are is the mission of The John Cardinal O’Connor School in Irvington, NY. We are a private school for children who learn differently. Students are taught by certified special education teachers, utilizing multisensory techniques in small class sizes to help children succeed both academically and socially. Call us today at 914-591-9330 to learn more about us and our language based curriculum.

Sources

  1. http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2014/09/10/343681493/this-is-your-brain-this-is-your-brain-on-music
  2. http://www.family-friendly-fun.com/family-health/therapy/music.htm